Mannix, and Some Personal Geography

August 6, 2008

One of the more noteworthy DVDs to arrive this year is CBS/Paramount’s June release of the first season of Mannix.  Because Mannix‘s first season differs considerably from the subsequent seven, these initial 24 episodes were not included in the show’s syndication package.  Unlike most of the familiar TV product that’s coming out on DVD these days, the early Mannixs are a time-capsule find that hasn’t been seen on American television for several decades.

I wish I should say that Mannix‘s lost year represents a major discovery, but that’s not quite the case.  Mannix was created by the team of William Link and Richard Levinson, eventually the men behind the juggernauts of Columbo and Murder She Wrote, but in 1967 just a pair of talented freelancers with credits on the likes of The Alfred Hitchcock Hour and Burke’s Law.  With Mannix, Link and Levinson attempted a revision of the private eye genre that anticipated the postmodern pulp reformations of Robert Altman’s The Long Goodbye or Jeremy Kagan’s The Big Fix

Their hero, Joe Mannix, was not the familiar hard-boiled loner archetype, operating out of a dingy office, with a wise-cracking secretary out front and a battered fedora and trenchcoat on the rack in the corner.  Instead he was a cog in a wheel, one of a fleet of impeccably dressed operatives in the employ of Intertect, a corporate detective agency crammed with high-tech equipment.  (Computers the size of a minivan that shuffled around stacks of punchcards, in other words.) 

Intertect was inspired by Link and Levinson’s experiences at Universal, the first of the Hollywood studios to track its employees by computer.  The Universal of the sixties was run by former talent agents inherited from its parent company MCA, who dressed in black suits and had offices in the fearsome obsidian monolith known as “The Black Tower,” a modern glass executive building that loomed over the front gates.  Lou Wickersham, the head of Intertect, was an insider joke on Lew Wasserman, the legendarily ruthless head of Universal.  (The name Wickersham was derived from “Wasserman” and Lankershim Boulevard, the North Hollywood address of Universal’s main entrance.  Joseph Campanella, who played Wickersham, once told me that his slight resemblance to Wasserman was a factor in his casting.)  Joe Mannix, the series’ nonconformist hero, was the only Intertect operative with the inclination to buck Wickersham’s unfeeling, bottom-line approach to sleuthing.

You can see how Link and Levinson intended Mannix as a platform for venturing into some Big Ideas.  Their scenario was a genre allegory that opened the door for sideways exploration of topics like mechanization, capitalism, the dehumanizing aspects of modernity, and so on. 

But Link and Levinson were out of Mannix even before a pilot was written, and the reins were taken by Mission: Impossible honcho Bruce Geller (who executive produced) and producer Wilton Schiller.  Schiller had produced the last three seasons of Ben Casey and the final year of The Fugitive.  He was competent but uninspired, as were most of the cadre of freelance writers who had followed Schiller from one or both of the earlier shows onto Mannix: John Meredyth Lucas, Chester Krumholz, Barry Oringer, Howard Browne, Sam Ross, Walter Brough.  In their hands, the conflict between Mannix and Lou Wickersham remained a constant element of the series, but it lacked any depth or metaphorical meaning.  The two characters simply bickered like unhappy spouses, and the clash between them never varied much in content or intensity.  It is fascinating to speculate as to how Link and Levinson might have developed their idea.  Might Mannix have become a prototype for the serialized drama of the eighties, with a character conflict at its center that grew more complex and gripping as time went on?

For the second season of Mannix, Intertect disappeared without explanation and Joe Mannix worked alone out of a stylish home-office.  Now he embodied the cliche Link and Levinson sought to undermine: a hard-boiled loner type with a wise-cracking secretary.  The initial revisionist concept had devolved into a totally classical text. 

Surprisingly, this wasn’t an altogether bad thing.  Mannix‘s new producers, veteran screenwriters Ivan Goff and Ben Roberts, brought in better writers and directors.  They crafted the familiar elements of the format into an appealing blend of old-fashioned mysteries and jazzy film-noir vibes.  Mike Connors, the series’ star, had a relaxed personality that fit the new Mannix better than the old one.  Connors was like that gregarious but no-nonsense uncle you knew you could count on to scare off the schoolyard bullies.

*

I first watched Mannix in 1995-1996, when the TV Land channel was rerunning it nearly every day.  I was in film school at the time, at the University of Southern California.  College was a frustrating experience, four years of searching for the intellectual stimulation I’d been promised the whole time I was growing up and finding it only on the margins of the experience – in the film archives, from exploring the city of Los Angeles,  or in long conversations with a few kindred spirits, but rarely in classes or amid the general campus population.  Often when there was a lull in the grind of studying or writing dull undergraduate papers, I’d unwind by consuming five or six Mannix segments in a row.  It was just the kind of smooth, undemanding escapism I needed.  It’s kind of a shame, but those marathons of Mannix (sometimes interspersed with Thriller, airing on the Sci-Fi Channel, or Route 66, on loan from a T.A. researching a doctoral thesis on road movies) number among my fondest college memories.

When I received my copy of the Mannix DVDs, I immediately took a look at a particular episode, “Turn Every Stone” – and not because, just by coincidence, it’s the only one credited to writer Jeri Emmett.  If Mannix is forever associated with USC in my memory, “Turn Every Stone” is the episode that reflects that memory back at me.

The climax of “Turn Every Stone” is a shootout between Mannix and the villains (Hampton Fancher and Nita Talbot) in the central courtyard of a tall, distinctive red-brick building.  That building is the Rufus B. Von KleinSmid Center, which stands on the east side of Trousdale Parkway, the main drag of the USC Campus.  (USC benefactors tended to have funny names; don’t get me started on the Topping Center, or Fagg Park.) 

Here’s a shot of Mike Connors and Fancher entering a classroom hallway:

And a better look at the tall, narrow interior columns, which convey the impression that the building all exterior and no interior:

An innovative use for the the basement level’s sunken courtyard:

The Von KleinSmid Center (or VKC, as the students call it) is one of the main classroom buildings at USC, and I probably attended a half-dozen classes in it during my four years there.  It’s one of the most commonly used locations on a campus that’s famous, at least among those who’ve done time there, as a ubiquitous backdrop in movies and TV shows.  When I was a USC freshman, I attended a screening of Copycat (1995), wherein my fellow students went wild upon catching a glimpse of VKC’s tall globe-topped spire; a few days later, I stumbled across Morgan Freeman shooting a scene for Kiss the Girls (1997) in a car being towed down Trousdale Parkway.  But the campus’s onscreen history goes back beyond tacky nineties serial killer flicks.  The Von KleinSmid Center was completed in 1965, and its then-modern architecture made it a magnet for movie companies in the sixties and seventies. 

USC’s most famous turn in the spotlight came during the same year that “Turn Every Stone” was filmed, in Mike Nichol’s The Graduate (1967).  Northern Californians and fans of the movie will be crushed to learn that, during the scene in which Dustin Hoffman pursues Katharine Ross back to Berkeley, “UC-Berkeley” is actually . . . USC.  Our first glimpse of Hoffman on campus during the scene scored to Simon & Garfunkel’s  “Scarborough Fair” comes as he’s walking down the low steps that surround VKC:

Hoffman then walks up a tree-shrouded, diagonal path through Alumni Park to the neighboring building, the thirties-era Doheny Library, the basement of which contains my favorite USC hangout, the Cinema-Television Library:

Later Hoffman and Katharine Ross walk down the same outdoor corridor that we see in Mannix:

The scene where Hoffman stands outside for the duration of Ross’s class was filmed inside VKC (you can tell from the narrow vertical windows), quite possibly in one of the same first-floor rooms where I had classes.  A subsequent shot was photographed through the same VKC window:

All of these buildings still look about the same today as they did forty years ago.

Parts of the USC campus also turn up for a split-second in Hitchcock’s Torn Curtain (1966), and in Antonioni’s Zabriskie Point (1970) – a great tracking shot that traces the route I’d take onto campus through the Jefferson Boulevard entrance, which was just across the street from my first L.A. apartment.  But since I’m a TV historian, and this a TV blog, the television appearances of the USC campus are what I’ve tracked with the most enthusiasm. 

In the original pilot for Harry O, a made-for-television movie called Such Dust as Dreams Are Made On (1973), the Von Kleinsmid Center is the backdrop for a conversation between David Janssen and S. John Launer (a fine character actor whom I interviewed during my USC years):

Outtakes from that sequence made it into the series’ opening titles. . .

. . . giving USC a weekly cameo in Harry O , under Janssen’s star billing card no less, throughout its two-year run:

Continuing its chameleonesque career of imitating other colleges, USC served as just “the University” in an “Until Proven Innocent,” a 1971 episode of Owen Marshall, Counselor at Law.  Lindsay Wagner played a judge’s daughter from wealthy Santa Barbara who was slumming at “the University” until she could transfer to George Washington University – a pretty typical USC co-ed, in other words.  Once again, the Von Kleinsmid Center is everpresent.  Wagner and Lee Majors roam both the sunken courtyard and the basement-level library (the real thing, not a set) in a lengthy scene.  Here, with Majors, Wagner, and Randolph Mantooth lined up in front of it, VKC looks as if it’s doubling as an acting school for dull Universal contract players.

VKC Owen Marshall

Decades later, USC did a sustained impersonation of Brown University on one of my favorite shows of the past decade, The O.C., as Seth (Adam Brody) visited the Rhode Island school and his inamorata Summer (Rachel Bilson) eventually went there.  But it was another bit of USC TV-fakery that really blew my mind.

I have to indulge in a detour now and explain a bit about why college in general, and USC in particular, were so disappointing to me.  Part of it is that for years of my parents and teachers had promised that college – far more than the public education which preceded it – would be the ideal atmosphere for my adolescent nerdiness.  Their assurances did little to prepare me for the realities of the shallow, alcohol- and party-feuled student life, or the cynicism and toxic academic politics among the faculty. 

But part of it was TV’s fault, because I’d put in a lot of time watching The Paper Chase when I was a pre-teen.  The Paper Chase, one of the great, underrated dramas of the eighties, was a smart, nostalgic portrait of life among law students based on John Jay Osborn’s autobiographical novel.  For a twelve year-old, the distinction between undergraduate life and an idealized Ivory League law school was subtle, and so The Paper Chase – and, really, nothing but The Paper Chase – shaped my conception of what higher education would be.  I had set myself up for a major shock.

Flash forward to my junior year at USC, when I’m conducting a phone interview with Ralph Senensky, a talented episodic television director of the sixties and seventies.  The Paper Chase was Senensky’s last major credit, and as we’re chatting about it, Ralph drops a bombshell on me: The Paper Chase‘s unnamed-East Coast-university-that’s-clearly-meant-to-be-Harvard was actually USC.  Every outdoor frame of it!

Later that year, on a holiday trip back to Raleigh, I dug out the last surviving tape of the Paper Chase recordings I’d made years before, and replayed the show’s final episode on my father’s dying Beta machine.  Sure enough, the office of Professor Kingsfield (the much-feared master teacher played to perfection by John Houseman) was located in the Bovard Administration Building, which is directly across Trousdale Parkway from the Doheny Library.  The Taper Hall of Humanities doubled as a classroom building.  I couldn’t be sure exactly where the exterior of the basement office of the Law Review (which I thought was so cool as a teenager, and which the show’s protagonist, James Stephens’ Hart, held in some esteem too) was, but it’s a redress of a side entrance to either Bovard or the neighboring Physical Education Building.

Coming near the nadir of my disillusionment with film school (I’d just completed my one grueling film production class), this seemed a particularly cruel blow.  I had gone back to revisit my cherished ideal of what college should have been and found those industrious, earnest grad students of my TV-fueled fantasy walking the same sunny SoCal campus that encircled my own dreary reality.

That moment was probably my first brush with a quality of living in Los Angeles that I later came to love.  I always get blank looks when I try to explain this to non-Angelenos (especially the ones who’ve been there and back and complain that there are no tourist attractions to visit), but one of the wonderful things about L.A. is the constant and somehow comforting awareness that you’re living out your life in the world’s biggest movie set.  The places you pass through in your daily travels are the same backdrops you see in countless movies and TV shows, and as you move through them the collective fiction of your moviegoing experience forms a sort of overlay upon your “real” life.  If you’re a film buff like me, your awareness of this duality is constant.  Los Angeles is a meta-city.  Elaine and Benjamin’s Berkeley is Hart and Ford’s Harvard is my USC, and who am I to privilege one of these meanings over another?  Some people come for the climate, some for the laid-back attitude (which is no myth, trust me) . . . but this is why I love L.A.

Thanks to David Gebhard and Robert Winter’s An Architectural Guide to Los Angeles for the crash course in campus architecture.  Updated 7/29/09 to include the Von Kleinsmid Center’s Owen Marshall, Counselor at Law episode.

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8 Responses to “Mannix, and Some Personal Geography”

  1. Marty McKee Says:

    I’ve only visited L.A. twice, but I love checking out movie and TV locations. I’ve been to Bronson Canyon twice and Vasquez Rocks once, as well as the Universal Studio tour. Yes, I realize that these are not exactly the most obscure locations (and I have many more I want to visit someday), but it’s always a kick to see, say, an old 2-part MISSION: IMPOSSIBLE shot at Bronson Canyon using nearly the same camera setup as a current movie like DRAGON WAR.

    I think you might be too hard on MANNIX. I think the first year holds up pretty well, basically because Connors is so good. William Link’s audio commentary on the pilot is hilarious, because–predictably, having not had anything to do with it–he has nothing to say about it. He and Levinson came up with the basic concept and the character names, and that seems to be about it.

    I also think Howard Browne and John Meredyth Lucas, who was STAR TREK’s story editor for a short time, were finer writers than you give them credit for (hey, different strokes…). Lucas died not many years ago.

    On a different subject, any stories about one of my favorite TV writers, Stephen Kandel, whose scripts were almost always better than par for whatever show he was doing? I’ll watch just about anything if I see his name in the titles.


  2. You’re probably right about Howard Browne and John Meredyth Lucas; they are a bit more distinguished than the other writers I named. I haven’t seen a lot of Browne’s work for Roy Huggins, but he wrote an atypical Fugitive episode, “A Clean and Quiet Town,” that’s one of the only episodes to explore the larger ethical consequences of Kimble’s conflict with the law.

    Lucas’ work is uneven, but he wrote some good Ben Casey scripts and a Medic episode that I even included in the “Top 100 Greatest Television Episodes” piece on my website. I spoke to him in the late 90s but he was a reluctant interview subject. Lucas’ memoir, unfortunately, finds his Hollywood childhood far more interesting than his own TV career.

    Marty, as for Stephen Kandel, it’s as if I’m feeding you the questions. I just recorded a funny and informative oral history with Kandel a couple of months ago, which will see the light of day somewhere … sometime.

  3. Marty McKee Says:

    Man, taunting me with an unpublished Kandel piece is uncool. :)

  4. JW Says:

    I know we’ve had these discussions before, but there really could be an entire “Los Angeles Plays Itself” simply focusing on clips from television episodes (or, expanding beyond that, made-for-TV films) with real Los Angeles locations. I bet you’ve already got a huge head start in documenting that, too!

  5. Greg Bright Says:

    I just read your Mannix blog and as an SC grad and a kid who watched Mannix on Sat nights with my grandmother in the ’60s & ’70s, really enjoyed your comments. For years, I have remembered an episode where Terry Pool, long thought to be dead was proven to be alive and up to no good by Joe’s review of dental records. If you remember the name of this episode and would pass it along, I would be grateful. Fight on! Regards, Greg

  6. Michael Douglas Says:

    As one who grew up in the Sixties (and loved “Mannix,” among others) I can see where the whole “intertec” concept came from. Computers were just starting to come into their own (though only the government and the larger corporations had them in the mid-1960’s), and there was a mystique about them and their supposed “infallibility” that both fascinated and scared people. Questions of whether we’d eventually be replaced by computers were explored ad nauseum in literature and especially sci-fi movies & TV shows. Comedies, particularly by the late 60’s, had taken to making fun of computers (especially that new phenomena “computer dating”), with their “mistakes” providing the punch-lines. I can recall many shows having an episode revolving around computers (“The Partridge Family” and “Love American Style” come immediately to mind). Parallel to the computerization trend was the whole corporate conformity trend, as documented in the book “The Organizational Man,” the movie “The Man in the Grey Flannel Suit” and others..

    I suppose it was only natural that someone would try to come up with a TV show that pitted the rugged individualist against the Corporation and it’s Computers. And to wed that idea to the always popular detective show genre must have seemed a natural back in 1966-67. But somehow it just never quite jelled during the first season of “Mannix”. The subtext of the old-fashioned, sloppy Mannix contrasting to the sterile, ultra-modern Intertec never provided nearly as much tension as the actual cases Mannix investigated. In fact Lou Wickersham, besides arguing with Mannix, mainly served to help Mannix out of misunderstandings with clients and scrapes with the police (including bailing him out of jail). Perhaps because the writers never invested enough time and plot into the Mannix vs corporation/computer narrative, or perhaps just because Mike Conners was so terrific and natural as a detective on his own that the whole Intertec prop seemed superfluous and unnecessary, As you alluded to, the banter between the Organizational Man, Lou Wickersham, and Mannix never had any real depth to it, nor did the research of the Intertec computers. Mannix always “flew by the seat of his pants” and generally disregarded the computers and their abilities, proving that good old dogged foot-slogging could resolve even the toughest case.

    During the rest of the show’s run, Mannix was freed from this unnecessary and time-wasting subplot. He was able to get whatever information he needed to solve a case from Peggy’s research, or some timely help from a friend on the police force. I’m glad they decided to drop Intertec and put Mannix out on his own. By doing so they made “Mannix” one of the most beloved and enduring detective shows of all-time.

  7. joseph forest Says:

    For a small town boy living in Southern Canada, I enjoyed the Intertec theme it was so cool to see the office building with all the computers , many years later I worked as a guard supervisor for a Toronto Company with the same sounding name. The company I worked for Internal Detective (Intertect). Where is the actual location of The Intertec building, and doeas it still exist? .

  8. Tietie007 Says:

    The Tv story …My mother loved Mannix.


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