Obituary: Noel Black (1937-2014)

July 23, 2014

BlackSkaterdater

Noel Black, director of the cult movie Pretty Poison as well as a number of television episodes and movies of the week, died on July 5 in Santa Barbara, according to his son, director and unit production manager Marco Black.  He was 77.

Born in Chicago, Black was a graduate student at the UCLA film school at the same time as Carroll Ballard (who would work on Black’s breakthrough short) and Francis Ford Coppola.  With producer Marshall Backlar, a UCLA classmate, Black used car- and tricycle-mounted cameras to shoot Skaterdater (1965), an exuberant, wordless pre-teen romance between skateboard boy and bicycle girl.

Laying a surf guitar score by Mike Curb over gorgeous, time capsule-worthy SoCal images, Black’s celluloid calling card won a prize at Cannes and got picked up by United Artists to accompany its feature A Thousand Clowns (an inspired paring).  Skaterdater also marked Black’s television debut, as the ambitious prime-time omnibus ABC Stage 67 showed it in March 1967 alongside two other short films it commissioned from Black (one shot in New York, the other in Louisiana), under the title “The American Boy.”

Pretty Poison, the mainstream feature that Black wrangled out of all this attention, was a troubled production in which the inexperienced director clashed with both his crew and his leading lady, Tuesday Weld (“neurotic as hell,” according to co-star John Randolph). (Weld: “Noel Black would come up to me before a scene and say, ‘Think about Coca-Cola.’ I finally said, ‘Look, just give the directions to Tony Perkins and he’ll interpret for me.'”) A very dark comedy about the bond between an arsonist (Perkins) and a budding psychopath, scripted by Lorenzo Semple, Jr., Pretty Poison was an important forerunner to the New Hollywood movement, not only in its flouting of conventional film morality and its New Wave influences (Andrew Sarris complained that Black had borrowed too conspicuously from Antonioni and Resnais) but in the unlikely marriage between film-school talent and big-studio machinery.

That studio, Twentieth Century-Fox, tacked on a conventional ending, of which Black disapproved, and dumped the movie anyway. Some of the hipper critics, including Pauline Kael and Joe Morgenstern, made a cause célèbre out of it, echoing the more high-profile battle fought over Bonnie and Clyde a year earlier. In casting and subject matter, Pretty Poison itself plays like a companion piece to Bonnie and Clyde – Weld, having turned down the leading role in Arthur Penn’s masterpiece, gives us a hint of what shape her Bonnie Parker might have taken in Black’s movie – as well as to Psycho and George Axelrod’s deranged Lord Love a Duck.

But as New Hollywood took off, it left Black behind. His next two features – Cover Me Babe (1970), about film students, and Jennifer On My Mind (1971), a druggie romance written by Love Story‘s Erich Segal – died at the box office and lacked for critical champions. Ambitious projects planned in the wake of Pretty Poison collapsed, among them an adaptation of Saul Bellow’s The Adventures of Augie March and an Erich Segal-scripted biopic on Railroad Bill. Instead, Black’s only other theatrical features were Mirrors (1978), a New Orleans-lensed voodoo thriller with Peter Donat and The Exorcist‘s Kitty Winn that sat on the shelf for four years; the comic caper A Man, a Woman and a Bank (1979); and the Brat Pack sex comedy Private School (1983).

Turning to television, Black directed one-off episodes of McCloud, Kojak, Hawaii Five-O, Quincy, M.E., and the 1980s revival of The Twilight Zone, as well as the pilot for the short-lived Mulligan’s Stew. His more literary work included adaptations of Sherwood Anderson’s “I’m a Fool” and Ring Lardner’s “The Golden Honeymoon” for PBS’s The American Short Story and Hortense Calisher’s “The Hollow Boy” for American Playhouse, as well as an Emmy-nominated version of Ray Bradbury’s “I Sing the Body Electric” (retitled “The Electric Grandmother,” with Maureen Stapleton and Edward Herrmann) for NBC’s Peacock Showcase. Black also directed a spate of mainstream movies of the week during their early eighties heyday, including The Other Victim (1981), with William Devane coming to grips with his wife’s rape; the Reginald Rose-scripted lesbian romance My Two Loves (1986); and Promises to Keep (1985), with Robert Mitchum acting opposite his son and grandson.

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3 Responses to “Obituary: Noel Black (1937-2014)”

  1. Tom Nawrocki Says:

    I’d like to see more of Black’s work, but I think the only thing of his I’m familiar with is “Jennifer on My Mind,” which was (and maybe still is) on Netflix streaming. It was so bad I was compelled to write about it: http://debris-slide.blogspot.com/2012/03/headlining-new-york-city-scuzz-festival.html

  2. Stephen Bowie Says:

    Yeah, Jennifer on My Mind is an MGM MOD release that’s on my list to get. I haven’t seen that, or Cover Me Babe either, although I guess the chances of that emerging in better shape than the full-frame version that’s always on Fox Movie Channel are exactly zero. Mirrors and the other ABC Stage 67 shorts are iffy, too; UCLA and AMPAS have “The River Boy,” but I’m not sure about the New York one (“Reflections”).

  3. Griff Says:

    I admired SKATERDATER enormously. It wasn’t simply influential — it was inspirational. PRETTY POISON was, of course, remarkable, regardless of its many production problems. No Lorenzo Semple, Jr. script was ever so well served.

    But the ambitious COVER ME BABE, lightly released by Fox, was slow going, and most of JENNIFER ON MY MIND was pretty terrible in conception and execution (though Robert De Niro was impressive in his scenes). After that, Black’s work seemed pretty straight-forward and prosaic. Not entirely without distinction, but not the same. I’d see his name on certain projects and wonder about the nature of his contribution. For instance, could the guy who directed the competently made, sweet-natured TV-movie QUARTERBACK PRINCESS (1983), with Helen Hunt, really be the stylist who had helmed PRETTY POISON? Black also wrote and produced the ’50s teen comedy MISCHIEF (1985), a film to which director Mel Damski didn’t bring much style or energy; I wonder whether Black regretted not directing the movie himself.


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